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Trickjumping

is an integral part of the game allowing a player to jump higher, farther and move faster. For further reading, see techniques section.


Single-beat strafe-jumping

is the most common variant of strafe-jumping. The player runs forward, jumps off the ground, in addition to the forward key immediately presses and holds one of the sidestepping keys, and, by moving the mouse, looks into the same direction as the initiated sideways movement. Very shortly before hitting the ground again, the player once more hits the jump button (this way contact with the ground is minimized and friction cannot set in) and immediately strafes and looks into the other direction. By flawlessly repeating this sequence, acceleration can be increased. But with gaining velocity, the angle of the mouselook has not only to be adjusted, but has also to be ever more precise, which makes strafe-jumping a demanding task.


Single-beat strafe-jumping with airchange

is essentially the same as single-beat strafe-jumping with the difference that the direction of the sideways movement and of the mouselook is turned to the opposite side in the middle of the second jump after takeoff instead of immediately turning after the first jump. After those first two jumps, the players usually do not apply this technique anymore.


Double-beat strafe-jumping

is essentially the same as single-beat strafe-jumping with the difference that the direction of the sideways movement and of the mouselook is turned to the opposite side not every, but only every second jump.


Since acceleration

only depends on the vectors of input, there are alternate ways to strafe-jump. The basic idea of half-beat strafe-jumping is to reduce the mouse movement by starting with a normal strafe-jump and then continue by only pressing the sideway movement key of the other direction. The vector (and thus the place where to point the mouse) is very close to the vector of the first normal strafe-jump. Hence the name half-beat.


Inverted strafe-jumping

is, since all strafing techniques are one kin, just another way to use the acceleration vectors. The idea is to only use the sideways movement keys, which will result in the exactly inverted movement of normal single-beat strafe-jumping.


In circle-jumping

the player starts by facing at an angle of 90° to the direction she/he intends to go. Then she/he starts going forward, adds sideways movement into the intended direction, and simultaneously turns the mouselook into the same direction. When facing into the intended direction she or he hits the jump button, keeps pressing forward and strafe, and goes on turning the mouselook. When flawlessly executed speeds of more than 500 ups can be achieved.


Vertical overbounce (VOB)

sometimes referred simply as Overbounce (OB)—The player falls from a certain height, without any sideways movement whatsoever, and is propelled up vertically again without loss of damage. It occurs when a player has 0 velocity in the XY components of the velocity vector (no horizontal speed).


Horizontal overbounce (HOB)

The player falls and has lateral movement. When hitting the ground she/he will receive substantial momentum and be catapulted in the direction of the prior lateral movement. It occurs when a player has more than 0 velocity in the XY components of the velocity vector (horizontal speed exists).


Sticky overbounce (SOB)

The gamephysics allows the players to have tiny offsets from the ground. These height changes occasionally produce new overbounce heights. Usually the sticky offset also produces an ob height to the ground the player is standing on, which can be used for small speed gains. There are two types of sticky overbounces—same height platforms and different height platforms. Same height platforms variation essentially cause the player to overbounce on the next jump, assuming that the landing will be on the same platform where the jump originates, or another platform that is at the same height. Different height platforms variation may also create an overbounce height for a platform below, for a height that is not normally an OB height. Sticky overbounces for same height platforms are useful for small speed boosts.


Diagonal overbounce (DOB)

also called weird overbounce (WOB)—As with the horizontal overbounce, the player falls and has lateral movement. When hitting the ground she/he taps the backward-key and is propelled diagonally into the air.


Zero-ups diagonal overbounce (ZDOB)

also called zero-ups weird overbounce (ZWOB)—An overbounce very similar to the DOB, just that it occures if the player hits the ground with zero X- and Y-axis speed and adds a very small movement at that very frame. This will result in a propelling comparable to the DOB, but more efficient.


Slippery diagonal overbounce (SDOB)

When the player hits a slippery surface out of an overbounce height with a small speed from 1 to 6 Quake ups, he/she will be propelled diagonally into the air, basically behaving like a DOB or a ZDOB.


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